Monthly Features

The Films of Guillermo del Toro

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Wednesday, Dec 13, 2017
Wednesday, Dec 20, 2017
Wednesday, Dec 27, 2017

This December, The Loft Cinema invites viewers to visit the weird and wonderful world of Guillermo del Toro with four of his classics on the big screen, as well as his new film, The Shape of Water, opening Friday, December 22 with preview screenings on December 21! 

An avid fan of comic books, fantasy and horror while growing up in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico in the ‘60s and ‘70s, Guillermo del Toro began developing his unique cinematic style at an early age, making imaginative Super 8 films featuring Planet of the Apes toys and killer potatoes as his stars.

“Well, the first thing is that I love monsters – I identify with monsters.” – Guillermo del Toro

After attending the Centro de Investigación y Estudios Cinematográficos in Guadalajara, del Toro studied makeup and special effects with legendary Hollywood effects artist Dick Smith (The Exorcist), and started his career in movies as an effects artist, forming his own effects company, Necropia. After making a series of short films, del Toro’s big break in feature filmmaking came with his 1993 vampire fantasy, Cronos, which won nine Ariel Awards (Mexico’s Academy Awards) and the International Critics Week prize at Cannes. After an unsatisfying experience making his first Hollywood film – the 1997 cockroach horror flick, Mimic – del Toro returned to Mexico to form his own production company, The Tequila Gang. He has since gone on to become one of the most acclaimed and visionary filmmakers of his generation, reinventing the genres of horror, fantasy and science fiction with films like The Devil’s Backbone, Hellboy, Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim, Crimson Peak, and his latest, the stirring 2017 romantic fantasy, The Shape of Water. Working with a team of artists and actors – and referencing a dizzying range of cinematic, pop-culture and art-historical references – del Toro, the King of the Modern Monster Movie, recreates the lucid dreams he experienced as a child in Guadalajara, combining political allegory, unabashed emotionalism and awe-inspiring special effects in ways that are uniquely his own.