Satan’s Cheerleaders

Showtimes

Things are going to get hotter than hell during HAIL SATAN MONTH at Mondo Mondays, featuring a kooky cauldron of satanic cinema that would entertain the devil himself!

“When these girls raise hell, there’s the devil to pay!” A high school cheerleading squad shakes their pom poms for Satan and things are going to get pretty devilish in this campy drive-in classic that could have only escaped from the 1970s!

“One of the silliest exploitation films to ever grace a drive-in screen.” – DVD Talk

Contrary to popular belief, the Benedict High School cheerleaders aren’t exactly sugar and spice and everything nice. The football team knows them well, and Billy, the school’s weirdo janitor, would like to. When he’s not spying on them in the showers, or putting curses on their underwear, Billy is secretly plotting to turn them over to a cult of Satanists on the lookout for a virgin to sacrifice. When the girls head out on a road trip for their first big game of the season, they run afoul of the sinister Satanists who want to use them in their ritual to raise the Devil. But finding an actual virgin among the cheerleaders is going to prove harder than hell, and Satan’s Cheerleaders may have a few tricks and treats in store for their creepy captors, leading to a truly stupefying night of horror, comedy and endearingly awful acting. An infamously ridiculous melding of two popular ‘70s B-movie genres (the demonic horror flick and the cheerleader sexploitation flick), Satan’s Cheerleaders begs the question: is this a scary movie trying to be funny, or a funny movie trying to be scary? How about neither? Deeply silly and mind-numbingly awesome, with chintzy special effects, terrible fashion choices and a story that seems to be made up as it goes along, Satan’s Cheerleaders features a surprisingly top-notch cast of seasoned professionals, including John Carradine and Yvonne De Carlo (aka Lily Munster), sandwiched in between a bevy of bouncing Playboy Playmates pretending to be high school cheerleaders. From the director of Joysticks and Black Shampoo! (Dir. by Greydon Clark, 1977, USA, 92 mins., Rated PG)